Author Archives: rainyleaf

Farwest

Agapanthus

There’s an event every August in Portland, Oregon called Farwest.  People come from all over the Western States and beyond to see what’s growing at the nurseries, what new plants are about to hit the market and to share information about greenhouse growing. The last piece is what really interested me.  I soaked up information from the experts like Suzanne Wainwright-Evans, the Buglady, and Paul Koole from Biobest.  Learning about growing plants always leads to learning about their pests.  In greenhouse growing we are using insects to control the pest insects.  It’s called biocontrol and it works!  But it’s a dynamic system and not easy to predict, so I’m constantly learning and gaining new insights into the intricacies of using bios.   A lot of exciting things are happening in this field and I hope to share some of them in upcoming posts.  

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Some of the displays are so creative, like this baseball themed showcase from Little Prince Nursery.  One of the best parts of the show is to see what’s new. What new tools are on the market for growing plants, what new colors the calibrachoa are sporting and especially what new plants are making their appearance.  A few of the new varieties that were the most popular were Mesa de Maya Southwest Oak, Sweet Tea Gardenia, Corydalis Porcelain Blue and Burgundy Lace Hazelnut.  The Oak has blue-gray leaves, grows to 25′ and can thrive in dry as well as irrigated sites.  Sounds like a perfect plant for NW landscapes, I look forward to seeing it in the nurseries. The gardenia is supposedly winter hardy in our area. I can’t wait to test that out, since the scent of this plant is in my top three favorites, top five, top ten….oh, there are too many sweet plants, pungent plants, sharp citrus, rosey fresh plants in this world.  I can’t narrow down the top ones.  This gardenia would make a wonderful addition to Washington gardens.  I know already I need one.  The corydalis has electric blue flowers and blooms spring through Fall, who could ask for more?  The hazelnut boasts that it alone has lacy, cut foliage, red leaf color and resistance to European Filbert Blight.  The new growth of the leaves are beautiful and it grows to 35′.  As always Portland has great food, good friends and a wealth of information.  I’ll be returning next year to Farwest.

The Plant That Will Start Anyone Blogging—The Lifesaver Plant

img_1186Huernia zebrina is the lifesaver plant. The plant that inspired me to start writing after a distracted break from blogging.  When something comes into my life, something usually has to go out and unfortunately my dear rainyleaf was the victim when I began teaching early morning seminary to the youth of my church. But it’s still summer and I’m ready reacquaint myself with WordPress once again. I’m more than ready, I’m excited to talk about plants!  I received this tender succulent from Sandy, the owner of Sunshine Enterprises, a wholesale nursery in the state of Washington. She grows herbs, geraniums, succulents and lots of other cool stuff.  At first glance this plant is cactus-like. Small, green and prickly.  Bumpy and spreading, it doesn’t have much to recommend it until summer arrives and this fantastic flower arrives.  It looks and feels just like a gummy lifesaver.  It’s incredible! This plant is a tender succulent and I brought it inside last winter. It appears to overwinter outside in zones 9 and above. It is easy to propagate from stem cuttings.  A piece of mine broke off and has easily rooted just sitting on top of the soil.  Perhaps it’s the color, but this flower seems very un-plant-like.  Maybe it’s the shape.  Who has ever seen anything like this outside of a roll of lifesaver candies? I’m looking forward to wathcing mine grow and producing more delicious flowers each year. Once sources says that Huernia is in the same family as Euphorbia, making it poisonous, so don’t eat it. But it’s definitely worth growing just for its funky flower.

Germinating Meconopsis

img_8321Growing this blue poppy is joy. True blue happiness.  I was delighted when my first Meconopsis bloomed last May. The color is a shimmering radiant blue that reflects the heavenly color of the sky and sea. It’s such a contrast to all the others flowers around that one can’t help but fall in love with this flower. As soon as mine bloomed I was already planning to collect the seed and propagate this precious gem. I waited for May to turn to June.  It produced three or four flowers during this time.  Each one was cause for a celebration.

This plant was new to my yard and the flowers surprised me. Like an unexpected guest. A surprise visitor.  Who could knock at my front door and visit me and produce such delight?  A professional athlete? A movie star? A president of our country? No, these people would be interesting but they wouldn’t bring me as much joy as Meconopsis. So as my poppy grew throughout the summer I kept watching the flower head, waiting for it to dry out so I could collect the seeds. Finally in August I couldn’t wait any longer and I cut open the three pods and teased the seeds out.  I put them in a little plastic box and they sat in my house until December.  I had instructions from the Rhododendron Species Garden where I purchased the plants the previous year.  The instructions said specifically ‘after collecting the seed, place in a ziploc bag and store in the refrigerator until sowing in November or December’.  Well I kept thinking about my little tiny Meconopsis seeds during the Fall and I even thought about the refrigeration part, but I never actually put them in there.  To busy, too tired, life was running too fast.  It’s hard to garden when you’re moving too fast. Plants don’t move at that pace. They force us to slow down. They make us look up.  They help our fingers dig deep in the earth. Thank you plants.

So in December I took my little seeds to the greenhouse and sowed them onto a flat of soil, very lightly covered with soil, and put them on the heated and lighted propagation bench.  I remember the instructions said that they grow like weeds, so I had high expectations. One week went by and nothing. I was disappointed, but not worried. Two weeks went by and I began to panic slightly. Three weeks went by and I thought this project was doomed. No more Meconopsis for me. My dream of a yard filled with blue poppies was dead. I was almost positive that the seeds were dead and done.  I was so distressed that I called up the Rhodie Species Garden and spoke with someone. They again confirmed the process for storing seeds: collect late summer, place in ziploc bag and put IN THE REFRIGERATOR or they will dry out and die.  He told me my seeds probably died, all dried out.  Noooooo I thought.  I would have to wait until next year and try again.  Could I wait that long? One season of plant life is like a seven of my years!  I wanted more seeds now! UGGGHhh.  I almost tossed out my seeding flat, kicking myself for not following the formula exactly.  I have a hard time following instructions exactly.  Usually I prefer to make up my own instructions as I go. But sometimes that doesn’t work so well.

Fast forward to January 9, an ordinary day in the greenhouse.  I was zipping around, watering, scouting for insects, helping students, etc… when I stopped in front of my Meconopsis flat.  It looked the same, just soil. Nothing. I kept staring at it. Look closely I told myself, you never know. Maybe the Rhodie Species Garden Guy was wrong. Maybe those poppies were tougher than we all thought. Just maybe…wait!  Did I see GREEN?  WAS THAT A TEENY TINY LITTLE LOVELY STEM EMERGING? Yes! They germinated!!! I could hardly believe it.  On Monday 4-5 tiny little seeds opened, shoots up and roots down. Cotyledons showing promise of a beautiful perfect poppy.  I was so excited. I know some plants take a long time to germinate, but these guys really made me nervous. And now it’s Wednesday and I counted about 20 tiny little shoots shyly poking their heads out of the soil. I’m on my way to a poppy garden. Oh joy!

 

 

 

 

 

November Days

I’ve often wandered through gardens in November thinking, ugh, it’s all dying! There is nothing beautiful left as the cold and the rains disassemble the plants, breaking them down and washing away the vibrant color and energy of spring and summer. At first glance it seems to be true. What is special about November? A birthday, Thanksgiving, maybe the first snowfall? But on closer inspection the changes happening in the garden are filled with color and life. Here are just a few of the reasons why I love November.

Arbutus menziesii

Arbutus menziesii, or the Madrone tree, is a beautiful tree native to Western Washington.  On a recent trip to Orcas Island I didn’t see any Orca whales but I kept spotting this amazing tree.   The most striking feature is the cinnamon red peeling bark in contrast to the young chartreuse green bark. The leaves are evergreen, alternate, oval and leathery.  The flowers are white, urn-shaped in large clusters, turning to orange-red berries enjoyed by birds.  This tree is not often found in the homeowners landscape, but it occurs naturally on dry, sunny rocky sites, especially around Puget Sound.  Arbutus means Strawberry Tree in Latin and menziesii is in honor of Archibald Menzies, a Scottish surgeon, botanist and naturalist.

I’m especially intrigued with the green bark.  It’s so vivid and bright.  I wonder about photosynthesis and what the advantage is to the tree to have such stunning bark.  Bright green to red to peeling away. And then ready to start all over again. I like this tree.

Summer Watering

Now that the hectic pace of spring has come and gone, it’s easy to think that all the hard work is over.  The planting, fertilizing, trimming and clean-up are all complete, shouldn’t we just sit in our Adirondack chairs and gaze serenely at the garden? We can’t forget one of the most difficult tasks a gardener faces, summer watering. With our Northwest summer drought, plants need consistent and thorough watering to grow and stay healthy.

I’ll never forget a Myrica californica that is growing in the arboretum.  When I first noticed it a few years back it appeared healthy. The leaves were green. It had new growth, but it was small.  We added irrigation to its bed and within a year it had doubled in size.  After two years it has tripled in height and width.  It’s a changed plant now, like it has a new breath of life with regular and consistent watering. I see its potential.  It’s interesting that we might think a plant is doing just fine.  It’s green.  It grows a bit every year.  And then suddenly when all its needs are met…wow! It can take off.

There are many methods available, sprinklers, watering cans, drip irrigation and in-ground irrigation systems with timers.  Water is a precious resource and we should always be thinking about conservation.  Setting up a home irrigation system such as drip irrigation may seem complex, but is really quite manageable. The main thing to remember is that plants prefer a thorough deep watering to a light superficial sprinkling.  When we spray the surface, the soil may appear dark and moist, but underneath the roots have no moisture. We have to allow time for the moisture to reach the root zone. Water when the soil dries out, more often when it’s hot and less when it’s cloudy and cool.

It’s happened so many times.  I think I’ve watered a container really well, whether a small four inch pot or a large patio container. I might have to dump the soil out or dig into the container, and I’m shocked to find out it’s dry at the bottom!  A good method is to water a container until the water runs out of the bottom.  I also like to give a container as much water as I think it needs.  And then do it again. Give it twice as much.  If the soil is too dry it can become hydrophobic and it takes a long time to absorb the water.  Then the container will have to be watered two or three times.  Over-watering can be a problem too, but only if the soil constantly remains wet and is never given the chance to dry out.

Planting similar groups of plants together can also help conserve water.  Annuals and big leafy perennials take more water than established shrubs and trees.  Keeping them in separate beds will make watering easier. Many of our Northwest native plants are tough and drought tolerant, but remember this is only after they have had a few years to grow a good root system. So when you add any new plants, even if they are ‘drought tolerant’, remember to water for the first two summers.  Mulching is a good idea as it helps retain moisture. Rhododendrons are usually ignored all summer, but these plants will really benefit from a consistent supply of water. Remember, a healthy plant that has been well watered and fertilized will more easily fight off insects and disease. Just like us, if we aren’t getting enough sleep or eating well we tend to get sick. So enjoy your summer garden and don’t forget to give your plants a drink. And then do it again.

Ladybug Summer

Today I was so excited to find ladybug larvae on my roses.  I was making the usual weekly rounds, dead-heading, checking things out, snipping out leaves with black spot and scouting for aphids.  Normally when I find a cluster of aphids I strip them off the leaves with my fingers (yes, I wear gloves).  Today as I was brushing them off I noticed a few ladybugs nearby.  And then I noticed there were still a few insects tenaciously hanging onto the stem, but they weren’t aphids.  Upon closer inspection I discovered they were the larvae of ladybugs, little aphid-munching machines. I was thrilled that beneficial insects were hard at work in my garden. I was also glad that I hadn’t sprayed any chemicals, not even Neem oil, onto the roses. The circle of life, happening in my yard! When people don’t have a lot of time it’s just easier to get a bottle of something and spray the roses when insects appear.  But if you really love your plants, you have to take a close look at them.  Spend time with them. Give them an afternoon.  That’s when you see what’s happening in the garden.